Intermittent pelvic Traction (IPT)

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Intermittent Pelvic Traction

Continuous Traction
Continuous or bed traction uses low weights for extended periods of time (up to several hours at a time). This long duration requires that only small amounts of weight be used. It is generally believed that this type of traction is ineffective in actually separating the spinal structures. In other words, the patient cannot tolerate weights great enough to cause separation of the vertebrae for that length of time.

Sustained Traction
This type of traction involves heavier weights applied steadily for short periods of time (for periods from a few minutes up to 1 hr). Sustained traction is sometimes referred to as static traction.

Intermittent Mechanical Traction
Intermittent traction is similar to sustained traction in intensity and duration but utilizes a mechanical unit to alternately apply and release the traction force at preset intervals

Manual Traction
Manual traction is applied as the clinician’s hands and/or a belt are used to pull on the patient’s legs. It is usually applied for a few seconds duration or can be applied as a sudden, quick thrust.

Autotraction
Autotraction utilizes a specially designed table that is divided into two sections that can be individually tilted and rotated. The patient provides the traction force by pulling with the arms and/or pushing with the feet. Investigations of auto traction have reported favorable clinical results but no change in size or location of lumbar disc herniation

Manual Traction
Manual traction is applied as the clinician’s hands and/or a belt are used to pull on the patient’s legs. It is usually applied for a few seconds duration or can be applied as a sudden, quick thrust.

Positional Traction
This form of traction is applied by placing the patient in various positions using pillows, blocks, or sandbags to effect a longitudinal pull on the spinal structures. It usually incorporates lateral bending and is only affected to one side of the spinal segment

Gravity lumbar traction
This involves using a chest harness to secure the patient as the treatment table is tilted to a vertical position, thereby using the weight of the lower half of the body to provide a traction force.